• The home football game on 8/31 has been moved to 8/30 for safety reasons. JV at 4:30 Varsity at 7

  • Drama Club is hosting the first Coffee House Night of the year in Room 5002 at 6pm Oct. 29th. Anyone is welcome to perform or come watch.

  • CJ Jones Live! at CHS CAC Oct. 23 Tickets are available now in room 6106 or at the CAC ticket window 6:00 PM the night of the performance

  • Parents go to the Biography Room in the CHS library on Thursday, October 23rd from 8-9:00am for information on Athletics

  • WELCOME DR. JOSH PORTER, OUR NEW PRINCIPAL!

Polynesian dance performance expresses another culture

Natasha Menard

The Polynesian club performed traditional Hawaiian and Tahitian dances at a lunch assembly on March 30.

Trina Kim, Staff Writer

Polynesian Club’s performance in the plaza on March 30 drew in many students that were interested in the different style and meaning of the dance.

“They used a unique movement of the hips,” freshman Sandra Shin said.

Polynesian Club hosted the assembly as a preview for their next upcoming performances in May. The club’s goal was to introduce the culture and dance of the Islands while promoting their events.

“It’s one of those dances that teach you culture,” junior Colleen Oh said. “You learn from it and get a true feel for Polynesian dancing.”

Polynesian dancing introduces two different styles: Tahitian and Hawaiian. Hawaiian style involves slower and smoother body movements while Tahitian dancing is more intense.

“My favorite is definitely Tahitian,” Oh said. “I find it a lot of fun. For Tahitian, your hips move with the music and the music accents your movements.”

The music was another unique factor as it was composed of traditional instruments such as drums and flutes. Each song held its own style, originating from a different island. Some of the major hits with the audience were the dance to the songs Pate Pate and Samulai.

“Most of their songs are upbeat and relaxing at the same time,” Shin said.

Another interesting aspect of the performance was their clothing. Polynesian Club donned fancy skirts called “lava-lava” in solid colors and beautiful flower patterns. Not only did the apparel add an aesthetically pleasing visual, it enriched the overall mood of the performance, tracing the dance to its true origins.

For most, the performance was an eye-opening experience: a chance for the Polynesian Club to express their hard work and to spread a new culture on campus.

“I was wrong about what the dance was going to be like,” Shin said. “I wanted to learn about their culture because its such a different way of dancing.”

To be further exposed to this distinctive dancing form, students should attend their Polynesian “Au Siva” Show on May 23 and 24. The assembly only proves that these two shows will be an exciting and worthwhile event for attendees.

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