College fair promises exciting prospects for students

Students speak to college representatives at the mini-college fair held Thursday, Feb. 21, at lunch. Many colleges as well as the military were in the Plaza to help students consider their post-high school college and career plans.

Omar Ortega

Students speak to college representatives at the mini-college fair held Thursday, Feb. 21, at lunch. Many colleges as well as the military were in the Plaza to help students consider their post-high school college and career plans.

Jennifer Kim, copy editor

During lunch on Thursday, Feb. 21 college representatives dominated Lancer Plaza, openly interacting with students already paging through their brochures.

From Arizona State University to the University of Alabama, the regions covered by all the colleges well-represented the broad possibilities too hard to grasp for many Californian students. Donning their represented college’s insignias, the regional advisors welcomed any student who stopped by their booth, excited to offer great prospects in places from New Mexico to Michigan.

“Looking at higher education, many California public schools are being impacted by budget cuts,” regional representative Makayla Hall said. “[Holy Family University] gives students opportunities outside of California in Philadelphia.”

To further encourage conversation and interest, not only did colleges offer free pennants and banners, but each college donated college spirit wear to a raffle. Each student received a ticket whenever they visit with a college, raising his possible chances of winning. CHS students, whether drawn by the raffle prizes or the colleges, didn’t hesitate to get involved in the college excitement.

“The [college fair] is more for underclassmen who can get started a little earlier,” guidance counselor Mr. Brown said. “Because ninth and most tenth graders stay on campus, we’re having this during student lunch.”

Because the admissions process is over for most seniors, the college fair primarily focused on underclassmen. However, seniors shouldn’t be hesitant to join because they’ve entered the waiting game for acceptances.

“We’re here to mostly talk to juniors, but still answer questions for seniors about the admissions process,” University of San Diego representative Christine Killoran said.

For all juniors, sophomores and freshman, it’s never too early to start preparing for college. With such an open college fair, all students should reap the advantages of meeting with representatives one-on-one to ask questions and understand more about the complex admissions process.

“I think its a great event to casually talk to someone outside of our area,” principal Dr. Steitz said. “College fairs really help create interest and build relationships with students.”

PTSA put together a larger-scale college fair for all students to enjoy. PTSA took the initiative in contacting college representatives and with such a great attendance, more are planned to help students take the first step in planning their futures.

“[All students] can still go to college directly after high school that is affordable and we’re here to offer that,” Hall said.