Attendance apocalypse plagues CHS

Seven students in Mrs. Britton's fifth period class came to class today.  During the period, they worked to catch up on classwork and finished work assigned for the upcoming two week break.

Michael Ricci

Seven students in Mrs. Britton’s fifth period class came to class today. During the period, they worked to catch up on classwork and finished work assigned for the upcoming two week break.

Talia Cain and Jennifer Kim

The world has ended for CHS.

Or so it would seem, as students trickled onto campus for class this morning.

According to attendance estimates, over half of the student population was not present on campus today, fearing the recent shooting threats and the Mayan apocalypse.

“I think it’s sad that fear has controlled so many people and others use it as an excuse to ditch school,” senior Annaise Meyers-Goldsby said.

There seems to be more seagulls than students occupying walkways during passing periods as well as the silence that consumes the school. It isn’t just a lack of seniors; the ditching fever has plagued the underclassmen as well.

“I think the lack of people willing to preserve the quality of their education is abhorrent,” senior Aaron Friend said.

The students who did decide to show up were rewarded with easier parking, smaller classes and individual appreciation from teachers.

“The students who came show extra responsibility and maturity,” English teacher Mrs. Hoyman said. “ I surprised and grateful that people showed up.”

Teachers laud students who took the courage to come to class despite opposing pressures. Students who somehow scoured excuses to miss another day of quality education are missing out on an opportunity to show teachers they care.

“Those who showed up got many gratitude points,” English teacher Ms. Parr said.

Even without the kudos from the teachers, some students enjoy the fact that they “own” the school for today.

“Yeah, I showed up,” sophomore Daleth Jacobs said. “It’s kind of fun not having anybody here.”

While the students are enjoying the leisures of kicking back and relaxing, the administration faces a different situation.

“The phone is ringing off the hook,” attendance clerk Ms. Miranda said. “It just won’t stop. We are ‘guess-timating’ probably at least half of the students didn’t come to school.”

They have received hundreds of calls thus far, and the end doesn’t seem imminent. The combination of a six-period day, the recent threats and the senior’s plan for an “early holiday” has affected the school in a magnitude that no one expected.

“Never has been there been this little and low attendance at Carlsbad High School,” attendance clerk Laura Ogan said. “This is the first time in history anything like this has happened.”