Facial Hair for Days

Shayan Housseini basks in enjoyment of his newly grown beard. Housseini as well as fellow male students and staff grew out their facial hair during the month of November for various reasons such awareness of prostate cancer or for personal enjoyment.

Amanda Navarro

Shayan Housseini basks in enjoyment of his newly grown beard. Housseini as well as fellow male students and staff grew out their facial hair during the month of November for various reasons such awareness of prostate cancer or for personal enjoyment.

Jessica Jenkins, staff writer

All month long, men of all shapes and sizes grow their facial hair out during the infamous “No Shave November”. Whether it be to boast of their grizzly and masculine qualities or to spread awareness for various men’s organizations (such as prostate cancer research), the facial hair of many will remain untamed and unshaved until December hits.

“I’ve wanted to grow it out, and this gives me a reason to,” Shayan Hosseini said. “At the same time I can be school spirited.”

Walking around campus, beards of all types can be witnessed. Many strike up conversations relating to their prided manes. Some take time to craft theirs like an art, while others let nature produce their masterpiece.

“I just sit there and it does its work,” Hosseini said.

This phenomenon can even be traced back to the ancient greeks. Although months were not yet developed, Plato devoted thirty day periods to boys becoming men where they would focus on intense facial hair growth. Vikings also used to pride themselves in their facial hair, and would teach their sons how to properly groom it.

It is also said that Karl Marx encouraged growing beards during the month of November to spite the capatalist business owners who would not approve. After this failed, “No Shave November” resurfaced through the faces of lazy college men.

Currently, many men grow their beards as a means to promote men’s health. It has also become a part of raising awareness and funds for prostate cancer research. For many, however, growing a beard or mustache provides quirky fun and entertainment for themselves as well as peers.

“My beard makes me feel more manly,” Hosseini said. “I feel way older than everyone else in my classes.”

For whatever the personal reason may be, facial hair continues to dominate the campus at every turn.