GO offers more than your average club

Friends at Go Club pose during a lunch  meeting. 
(photo credit: Jun Hee Kim)

Jun Hee Kim

Friends at Go Club pose during a lunch meeting. (photo credit: Jun Hee Kim)

Allie Gordon, staff writer

Last Friday’s club fair demonstrated just how many clubs you can find here on campus. From culture to volunteerism to rock climbing, there is a club for nearly every interest.

However, one club sets itself apart from the others. In a category unique to itself, Go Club is based on a deceptively simple board game, called Go.

Go originated in China over two thousand years ago, and people of all ages still play it around the world today. The board looks like a grid, with black and white stones for each of the two players.

“Unlike chess, where one is required to learn many different rules to play the game, there is only one rule for go,” junior Jun Hee Kim, president of Go Club said, “Get more territory than your opponent.”

In order to get more territory, players simply place stones on intersections of the grid to make a border around empty space. Players can also try to surround their opponent’s pieces and “eat” them. The game ends when all territory is surrounded, and the player with more wins.

Seems easy? It’s not. This sneaky simplicity of the rules allows each player to develop their own style and strategy, which makes the game extremely complex to play, and all the more interesting.

Moreover, Go offers benefits to players other than the thrill of victory. Playing Go helps players improve their information retention, pattern recognition, and problem solving skills.

“The best part of my club, is the fact that members are able to get more than just learning another board game,” Kim said. “Because Go reveals one’s characteristics through different playing styles, members become close quicker.”

Go Club offers more than your average school club. If the knowledge of Go, strategic skills, and friendships that go with the club are not enough, Kim also plans to start an SAT prep program coordinated through Go Club he plans to start by next year.

“SAT exams are stressful and are difficult, but based on the financial support of different families; some students receive significantly less preparation for this exam.” Kim said, “So, I thought having a cheap or free program that imitates what I did in summer SAT summer prep course would give students a better idea of what to do than just doing a self study.”

For anyone interested in joining Go club, or writing the monthly newsletter, informational meetings will be held Sept. 13 and 14 in room 7203, and regular meetings will be held Tuesdays and Thursdays.