How to pass your driver’s test

Jennifer Kan

Nick La Bounty, Assistant Editor

Tired of waiting at your friend’s house for your parents to pick you up or at the back gate trying to hitch a ride to lunch? When the day of your driver’s test arrives, you want to be prepared. Here’s some tips to help you pass.

Prepare
Practice with a qualified driver for the required 50 hours (10 at night).

Know the buttons specific to your own car such as: emergency lights, defroster,windshield wipers, horn, emergency break and hand signals.

Make sure to get a good night’s sleep and eat a nutritional breakfast before the test.

Bring all your documents
Permit, proof of insurance, registration for the car, and proof of behind the wheel sessions.

Relax
Before the test, take deep breaths and visualize yourself passing. Pretend this is any other drive, try not to fall victim to “test anxiety.”

Scan
One of the most common point deductions is for not scanning. At every light, stop sign, or turn, a simple head swivel can save precious points. Also, the tester will feel more confident in your abilities if you regularly glance at all three of your mirrors.

Use the SMOG technique when changing lanes
Signal. This makes other drivers aware of your intentions. Mirrors. Check your mirrors for any car that may be surrounding you. Over the shoulder. Fully turn your head to see if a car is lurking in your blind spot. Go!

Try to maintain the same speed when doing lane changes. Never slow down more than a couple MPH’s in order to avoid someone from rear ending you. Speeding up to pass a car in the lane adjacent to yours is actually safer than slowing down.

Always check back in front of you before changing lanes in case of any slowing traffic or new obstacles

Don’t hit the curb
After parking next to a curb, you will have to drive in reverse for about 30 feet. If you hit the curb, it’s an automatic fail. Practicing the day before can go a long way.

Don’t be afraid to get cozy with your tester and put your hand on the passenger seat while looking behind you.

Student tips:

“Be nice to the instructor, your attitude can affect your score.”- Junior Matt Crowder

“Keep both hands on the wheel at all times.” – Senior Max Johnson

“Strike a quick conversation with the instructor, but try not to talk so much that it becomes a distraction”. – Senior Chase Tutoris

“Make sure you look at your mirrors all the time. Even if you think you look like a weirdo!” – Junior Shyenn So

“Drive at a comfortable pace. Two to three miles under the speed limit is better than two or three over.” – Junior Sam Miller