Lesser known Coachella bands steal the festival

Megan Foy, Editor In Chief

There’s a reason why Coachella has headliners; those artists have a following and they’re loved by many. However, all headliners have small beginnings. Coachella holds gems in those smaller scale tents, gems that could very well headline in a year or so. For each day, here are memorable but small time performances that were not on the main or outdoor stage but deserved the same spotlight.

Friday: Cut Copy

Between their recent album Zonoscope and their much beloved, past songs, the Australian Cut Copy kept the energy high and maintained the perfect mix of old and new in their set list. Somehow, the band performed at such a incredible level that each song was better than the one before, always topping what was already great to begin with. And just to keep the crowd on its toes, the seemingly miscellaneous door on the stage became an optical, special effect half way through the set where a storm divided among itself among many other artistic illusions. The most important thing to note is the general grins from ear to ear as people could not help but dance to Cut Copy’s subtle 80’s feel and electropop. Cut Copy masterfully defined what a “crowd pleaser” is and should be.

Saturday: The Tallest Man On Earth

For someone who is actually small in stature, solo singer-songwriter Kristian Matsson had a big, powerful and intoxicating sound. His voice is undoubtedly unique and rich and it seems to paint the lyrics he’s singing with sensitivity and pain. Tallest Man as a person was incredibly humble and admitted to being nervous which made him all the more lovable. The fact that he did his own sound check proves how he takes pride in his work, his art that he obviously feels so connected to. Moreover, the way Matsson experimented with songs he “just learned the other day” marked him as a true artist that has prowess and skill. When he performed “Love Is All,” Tallest Man created an atmosphere unlike any other, one of hypnotic adoration for his beautiful songs. And that alone made it an unforgettable performance.

Sunday: Twin Shadow

For a darker, new wave 80’s pop sound, the mood was light and carefree for the Twin Shadow show. Their songs about being young and remembering past loves makes a connection with each listener where you notice people swaying, allowing the music to bring them back to who knows what kind of memories. The effect Twin Shadow has on people is evident when everyone becomes alive as “When We’re Dancing” hardly even started with two notes. The band had no need for a backdrop, elaborate sets or lights. They just put their music on display, nothing else. There’s a sense of confidence in that bold move; it says that Twin Shadow knows that their music is entertaining and captivating enough. Twin Shadow delivers a rare show that connects with its audience solely with its music.

Considering the qualities of these performances now, the future can only hold bigger and better shows, if that’s even possible.