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Community supports beaten Giants fan

Ashley Perez, Assistant Editor

Talk about poor sportsmanship! On March 31, Giants fan Bryan Stow was viciously attacked by two Dodgers fans in the parking lot after the game. Currently, no arrests have been made.

The Los Angeles Dodgers played their opening day game against the San Francisco Giants, winning the game by 2 -1. After the game, Stow, dressed in Giants gear, was severely beaten by two Dodgers fans. They kicked him repeatedly and then fled the scene. Stow was taken to the hospital and is currently in a coma.

Corey Maciel, who was with Stow at the time of the attack, made an appearance on “Mason and Ireland” show on ESPN radio to describe the incident.

“It was pretty hostile just walking up to the stadium. We got things thrown at us the whole time,” Maciel said. “I never saw [the attack] coming. My other friend Jeff got hit in the mouth and Bryan got hit from behind.”

However cruel and violent the act may have been, some feel that Stow and his friends shouldn’t have been at the game.

“It’s really sad what happened to him,” Senior Isidro Perez said. “I feel bad but I also think he shouldn’t have been wearing Giants gear at Dodger stadium. It’s like wearing the wrong color in another gang’s neighborhood.”

The Los Angeles Dodgers and San Francisco Giants have been long-standing rivals. Throughout the years, fans and players alike have both shared a hatred of each other often leading to fights on the field and off. Though this rivalry is understood by both sides, many people thought that they shouldn’t have to fear for their lives at a baseball’s game.

“You should be able to go to a baseball game and feel safe,” Senior Alex Hewitson said. “[Baseball games] are supposed to be fun, family events. People take sports too seriously.”

Since the attack, the Giants and the American Medical Response (Stow’s employers), have been collecting donations at the gates and throughout the ball park to pay for Stow’s medical bills. The Giants made an initial contribution of $10,000.

On April 8, Stow was honored at the Giants home opener game during the pre-game ceremonies. He remains in a coma with his family staying close by.

There is a $100,000 award for any more information about the attack. Donations to the Bryan Stow Fund can be made online. Visit sfpcu.com for more information.

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