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“Black Swan” or whack swan

Ciara Woods, Staff Writer

New hit movie “Black Swan,” seems to be the latest talk around town, or country for that matter. This movie was recently nominated at the Critic’s Choice Awards for an impressive twelve awards. However, not everyone applauds director Darren Aronofsky’s work in the “Black Swan.”

In the movie, Nina (Natalie Portman) plays a veteran ballerina in New York City. The director of a renowned ballet company decides to replace the star dancer for their new production of “Swan Lake.” Nina is his first choice, but she competes with Mila Kunis’ Lilly for the role of the Swan Queen. He desires a dancer who can portray both the White Swan’s innocence and the Black Swan’s lust. Nina fails to fit the role of the Black Swan so she desperately tries to attain the darker image of the Black Swan.

Although Portman and Kunis managed to bring the movie up a notch, both movie-goers and critics alike think that the plot-line is stale. The movie starts on a bad note; too slow, without an effective hook to reel the audience in.

“The movie was alright. Once the first action scene came it got better, but then it was all redundant,”  Junior Andoni Garcia said.

Because Nina grows obsessed with achieving the perfect persona of the Swan Queen, she develops schizophrenia. This juicy new twist leaves the audience excited to stay tuned for more excitement, however, the movie fails to produce.

“The whole thing was really weird and there wasn’t even a twist at the end,” Junior Ryan Black said.

The severity of Nina’s split personality worsens, predictably. The darker side of her starts to take over and her irrational behavior grows boring fast. This is when crude scenes are implemented in attempt to liven up the movie.

“I went to go see a good movie with my parents, but I just felt uncomfortable the entire time with the sensual scenes,” Junior Shannon Caulfield said.

Even actress Portman said she was timid to shoot the scandalous scenes. Kunis was also worried that the audience might get the wrong message from the risqué shots.

In other words, sensuality is necessity, while purity is drab. This theme is dragged throughout the movie until finally Nina cannot take the pressure to indulge herself in such a devious character.

In a recent “Saturday Night Live” sketch, Jim Carrey sums up the outrageous, twelve-award-nominee ending, by saying “Once you go Black Swan you never go back, Swan.”

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